April 9 Film on Death with Dignity

How to Die in Oregon
If you were terminally ill, would you want the right to choose? The award-winning documentary film How to Die in Oregon follows 52-year-old Cody Curtis, grappling with end-stage of liver cancer, as she decides to utilize Oregon’s Death with Dignity law.
Join Dr. Rebecca Thoman and Rev. Harlan Limpert for a discussion following the film. Rebecca Thoman, M.D., is a manager of Compassion & Choices’ Doctors for Dignity initiative. Harlan Limpert, retired COO of the Unitarian Universalist Association, leads the Minnesota Interfaith Clergy for End-of-Life Options.
Tuesday April 9, 7 to 9:30pm at the home of Linda Bergh, 4315 Xerxes Ave. South, Minneapolis. Look for the Earth Flag flying.
On March 7, 2019, the End-of-Life Option Act, House File 2152, was introduced in the Minnesota House of Representatives:30 by Rep. Mike Freiberg. The bill would authorize medical aid in dying in Minnesota.
Compassion & Choices envisions a society that affirms life and accepts the inevitability of death, embraces expanded options for compassionate dying, and empowers everyone to choose end-of-life care that reflects their values, priorities and beliefs.

January Gathering: Showing of “In the Parlor: The Final Goodbye”

The documentary “In The Parlor: The Final Good-Bye,” written by Heidi Boucher and directed by Heidi Boucher and Ruby Sketchley, is an intimate portrait of three families opting to care for their loved ones after death.

Watch the trailer here: http://intheparlordoc.com/trailer/

from intheparlordoc.com

MTN Twin Cities invites you to a showing of “In the Parlor”
Tuesday, January 15, 2019, 7:00-9:00 pm
Falcon Heights Church, United Church of Christ
1795 Holton St, St Paul, MN 55113 (click for map)

MTN events are free and open to the public. Donations of the heart accepted.

December Movie Night: The Art of Natural Death Care

art of natural dying

Katelyn LaGrega’s 2017 film, “The Art of Natural Death Care,” from the Sophia Center in North Carolina, shows families caring for their loved ones after death. The 27-minute documentary, which was presented at the 2017 National Home Funeral Alliance conference, includes clips of MTN’s Linda Bergh.

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 5, at 7:00 PM at 21 E Rustic Lodge, Minneapolis, MN 55419.

All MTN Events are free and open to the public. Donations of the heart accepted.

Twin Cities Meeting November 9: A Family Undertaking

What is old is often new again. Elizabeth Westrate’s A Family Undertaking uncovers a growing social trend: the home funeral movement. More often, Americans are choosing to do it themselves when it comes to burying loved ones and easing their own grief. Far from being a radical innovation, however, keeping funeral rites in the family or among friends is exactly how death was handled for most of pre-twentieth century America.
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The showing will take place on Wednesday, November 9 (please note! Wednesday meeting!) at 7 pm, at the home of Anne Murphy, 287 Mount Curve Blvd., St. Paul, MN 55105 (follow link for map). Minnesota Threshold Network meetings are free and open to the public, but donations of the heart are gratefully accepted.

Twin Cities April Movie Night: Passing Through Our Hands

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Passing Through Our Hands: a home funeral care guide video

We will have a movie night on Tuesday, April 12, 2016, 7 pm, at the home of Kathy Huset, 1811 West Minnehaha Ave., St. Paul (enter through front door, go up two flights of stairs); 651-645-8313. We will be screening Passing Through Our Hands: Home Funeral Care Guide, a documentary on after-death care of the body. Most of us have few opportunities to learn how to care for a body; this short film gives step-by-step instructions on how to do that in a simple, dignified, and loving way.

“Passing Through Our Hands” starts when the person dies and covers how to wash the body, dress and lay out the body, hold a vigil, and move the body into a coffin. It includes a link to guidelines and written instructions in addition to the video training.

If you would like a copy, visit Passing Through Our Hands. Cost is $15.

August link roundup

TEDx “Let’s Talk About Death”
For an honest 15-minute TEDx presentation, check out the 2015 “Let’s Talk About Death” by Rochelle Martin, a Canadian crisis-care RN and death midwife.
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A recent New Republic in-depth story on family-directed after-death care represents “an unprecedented effort to truly listen to Elizabeth Knox and Merilynne Rush” (home funeral educators in Maryland and Michigan respectively) according to National Home Funeral President Lee Webster.
Who Owns the Dead?
“It was a Sunday in the autumn of 1995, and Rob Sanders was driving his three kids from his house in Baltimore to the house of his ex-wife, Elizabeth Knox, in Silver Spring, Maryland. The kids rotated who got to sit in the front seat, and today was seven-year-old Alison’s turn. The boys wanted to hear the Redskins game, and when Alison leaned forward to fiddle with the radio, Sanders told her to sit back—he would find it.
“When he looked up, the light had turned red, and he braked, belatedly. Skidding into the intersection at about 14 miles an hour, he hit another car, and the passenger-side airbag deployed. The airbag—one of those early models designed to protect a full-sized adult male in a much more violent crash—struck Alison “with the force of a heavyweight boxer,” as Knox would later put it, rendering the girl unconscious and braindead in an instant.”