MTN Twin Cities September Meeting: Excitement Swap

Join MTN Twin Cities for our annual reading information exchange: with a twist. Bring a book, article, or burning question that’s got you fired up and thinking about death and dying issues in new ways, even if it’s not directly related (though of course we love hearing about those, too). For instance, some questions we’ve been asking include: How do we fight hate with love? How might our culture’s fear and avoidance of death feed the acts of hate and oppression that have recently been committed in this country, and what can we do to change it?

We’ll each talk briefly about our materials and ideas and then use all of that excitement to help determine MTN TC’s direction for the coming year.

Our passions pull us in many directions. We embrace that complexity and look forward to seeing where it leads us.

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, September 19, 2017, at 7:00 pm. We will meet at the home of Anne Murphy, 287 Mount Curve Blvd, St. Paul 55105. MTN TC meetings are free and open to the public.

get-excited-and-make-things-happen

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August link roundup

TEDx “Let’s Talk About Death”
For an honest 15-minute TEDx presentation, check out the 2015 “Let’s Talk About Death” by Rochelle Martin, a Canadian crisis-care RN and death midwife.
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A recent New Republic in-depth story on family-directed after-death care represents “an unprecedented effort to truly listen to Elizabeth Knox and Merilynne Rush” (home funeral educators in Maryland and Michigan respectively) according to National Home Funeral President Lee Webster.
Who Owns the Dead?
“It was a Sunday in the autumn of 1995, and Rob Sanders was driving his three kids from his house in Baltimore to the house of his ex-wife, Elizabeth Knox, in Silver Spring, Maryland. The kids rotated who got to sit in the front seat, and today was seven-year-old Alison’s turn. The boys wanted to hear the Redskins game, and when Alison leaned forward to fiddle with the radio, Sanders told her to sit back—he would find it.
“When he looked up, the light had turned red, and he braked, belatedly. Skidding into the intersection at about 14 miles an hour, he hit another car, and the passenger-side airbag deployed. The airbag—one of those early models designed to protect a full-sized adult male in a much more violent crash—struck Alison “with the force of a heavyweight boxer,” as Knox would later put it, rendering the girl unconscious and braindead in an instant.”